Quick Answer: What Literary Device Has Been Used In Wise Ignorance?

Is ignorance is bliss a metaphor?

A common expression used to describe these situations is “Ignorance is bliss.” This phrase is an idiom, which is means that it isn’t meant to be taken literally.

Idioms can make a striking point but can’t be interpreted as actual fact.

Take a closer look at a few examples of ignorance is bliss..

What does Antiphrasis mean?

: the usually ironic or humorous use of words in senses opposite to the generally accepted meanings (as in “this giant of 3 feet 4 inches”)

What is a anaphora?

An anaphora is a rhetorical device in which a word or expression is repeated at the beginning of a number of sentences, clauses, or phrases.

Who says ignorance bliss?

Thomas Gray’sThe saying “Ignorance is bliss” originates in Thomas Gray’s poem “Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College” (1742). The quote goes: “Where ignorance is bliss, ’tis folly to be wise.” Face it: you were better off not knowing that, weren’t you?

What is true bliss mean?

Bliss is a state of complete happiness or joy. Marriage is often associated with this joyous feeling: people who are married and still in love are described as living in wedded bliss. Another common association is heaven or paradise, as in eternal bliss.

Which literary device is used in the sentence?

Definition: Alliteration is a literary device where words are used in quick succession and begin with letters belonging to the same sound group. Whether it is the consonant sound or a specific vowel group, the alliteration involves creating a repetition of similar sounds in the sentence.

What are the 15 literary devices?

Here are 15 literary devices to use in your writing:Allusion.Diction.Alliteration.Allegory.Colloquialism.Euphemism.Flashbacks.Foreshadowing.More items…•

What are the 20 literary devices?

20 Top Poetic Devices to RememberAllegory. An allegory is a story, poem, or other written work that can be interpreted to have a secondary meaning. … Alliteration. Alliteration is the repetition of a sound or letter at the beginning of multiple words in a series. … Apostrophe. … Assonance. … Blank Verse. … Consonance. … Enjambment. … Meter.More items…•

What are the 9 literary devices?

Terms in this set (24)Metaphor. A figure of speech founded on resemlance eg. … Hypebole. Exaggeration; a figure of speech exceeding truth.Onomatapoeia. The formation of words by imitation of sounds eg. … Simile. A figure of speech consisting in likening one thing to another. … Analogy. … Personification. … Alliteration. … Foreshadowing.More items…

What are the 10 poetic devices?

Top 10 Key Literary DevicesMetaphor.Simile.Alliteration.Hyperbole.Imagery.Onomatopoeia.Symbol.Repetition.More items…•

What is an Apophasis in literature?

Apophasis (/əˈpɒfəsɪs/; Greek: ἀπόφασις from ἀπόφημι apophemi, “to say no”) is a rhetorical device wherein the speaker or writer brings up a subject by either denying it, or denying that it should be brought up.

What is an example of a situational irony?

Common Examples of Situational Irony. A fire station burns down. This is unexpected because one would assume the fire chief would keep his own building safe. A marriage counselor files for divorce.

What is an example of chiasmus?

What is chiasmus? … Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order. The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus.

Is ignorance is bliss a cliche?

409 b.c.) and quoted by Erasmus in the early sixteenth century, the precise wording of the cliché comes from the closing lines of Thomas Gray’s poem, “Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College” (1742): “Where ignorance is bliss, ’tis folly to be wise.” Both it and blissful ignorance became clichés in the nineteenth …

What are the 7 literary elements?

Writers of fiction use seven elements to tell their stories:Character. These are the beings who inhabit our stories. … Plot. Plot is what happens in the story, the series of events. … Setting. Setting is where your story takes place. … Point-of-view. … Style. … Theme. … Literary Devices.